Food

IMG_7868Homemade Wontons (馄饨)
One way I (Junwen) cope with homesickness as a Singaporean living in Los Angeles is to make familiar Asian/Singaporean food at home. (Footnote: Although LA has no shortage of Asian restaurants, I find it therapeutic to make the food at home because it conjures up memories of my Ah Ma making delicious food from scratch) I had found basic ingredients to make wontons from a Japanese supermarket near our home in West LA. Thus, here’s what I did to make my own version of homemade wontons.

The raw ingredients I used to make the wonton filling were: [Read more...]

BitteIMG_3910r gourd dinner
I (Junwen) recently made stir-fried bitter gourd (also known as bitter melon) and shrimp (we refer to them as “prawns” in Singapore) with butter. Here’s how this dish came about: [Read more…]

 

Turtle Bread

Turtle Bread

 Turtle Bread
Oh man you guys, just look at how CUTE this little Turtle is! Look closer: he is made out of bread! He is Turtle Bread! When I was traveling in Switzerland for a work meeting last week, I was overwhelmed by the amount of delicious home-made bread you could find just about everywhere you went. [Read More to find out out Turtle Bread led me to yet another Dutchinese connection!]

Kueh or Kuih

Kueh or Kuih

紅龜粿 (Ang Ku Kueh) for the New Year
Happy New Year! 新年快乐! (Pronounced: “Xīnnián kuàilè” or to my American ear, “SING nee-en KWAI-leh”) As my previous post mentioned, Junwen and I are currently in Singapore! We’ve been visiting family and friends, just taking the time to be together and to enjoy the holidays. We had considered visiting for the Chinese New Year, but the way recent life events unfolded, we decided to visit over the Christmas season.

Today is the first day of 2015 (though back in the States, friends and family are still hours away from the New Year’s countdown)! This morning my mum offered me a delicious treat to try: 粿 (Hokkien) or “kueh”, pronounced like “kway” or “gway”. (I’ve noticed that the “k” and “g” sounds in Chinese/Hokkien are very close in sound, similar to the way “p” and “b” are similar in Chinese/Hokkien.) You may also find it spelled, “kuih”. She picked it up from a famous stall in Outram Park, Ji Xiang Confectionary. (The link takes you to their Facebook page, where you can see more pictures of the aunties preparing the cakes.) [Read More…]

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